Writing Your Origin Story

WHY YOUR ORIGIN STORY MATTERS


As part of the Never Binge Again(TM) Coach Certification Program, we had to write and then share our origin story, particularly as it related to our personal struggles with healthy eating. This exercise then would convey reassurance to our clients that our motivation and empathy to help them came from our own personal experience.  At first I thought it would be a silly exercise.  Did I even have a compelling “origin” story that I could articulate? And at a deeper level, was I afraid to share my “story” for others to read.

As humans, we love and crave narrative. We’re curious beings. And we want nothing more than to relate to others.

Most of us come from humble beginnings, and we love it when successful people and brands—not to mention superheroes—reveal theirs, too. It makes us feel a little bit better that Superman was raised by two normal parents on a farm, and that Clark Kent is treated like a bit of a geek.

At the heart of every great origin story is a single event that forever changes the course of the teller’s life. Typically it arises out of failure or disappointment; sometimes it’s an unexpected discovery. Very frequently, another person illuminates a new way forward.

Writing down and truly understanding your origin story can help build compassion and empathy for who you are and what you’ve come from and through. It can allow you to change the story you tell yourself about yourself and facilitate greater expression of the true self within -- all so you can access reservoirs of hidden potential and ultimately become the best version of who you really are.

I encourage you to put some thought into your story and think about what in your life has shaped you thus far.  Often we can point to times of trauma and suffering in our past which we can reflect on to give us some clarity on how we’ve lived as a result. Or relish the triumphs that fuel us to keep transforming. It could be a brush with death, or a medical diagnosis or loss of someone to disease. Patterns tend to get developed in us from when we are very young and by writing your story things may come to light that you may not have thought about in years. It’s YOUR story and so worthwhile to tell.

Justine Divett